Depression After Retirement and What You Can do to Overcome it

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According to the World Health Organization, over 20% of adults aged 60+ suffer from a mental or neurological disorder, and among the most common is depression, which is often caused by retirement and the loneliness that it entails.

Retirement, well, that stage of life may sound far away, but it is a reality that sooner or later we will get to that point. Many imagine it as a golden stage in our life. In my case, I visualize it through my parents. They are fortunate since they have a roof over their head, food, good health, in addition to having the possibility of traveling.

But this journey is not hunky-dory for everyone, as some people cope with depression after retirement. Imagine this scenario. It is as if you were a famous boxer who has achieved everything based on effort and dedication. However, the next day you have to hang up your gloves. At first, it can be very comforting. You do not have to get up early, train for hours, eat things you do not like, etc. It sounds incredible, don't you think? Unfortunately, many retirees feel fearful of this new stage and have pleasant feelings mixed with a certain anxiety and concern; because being owners of their time is an unprecedented experience in their lives, which leads them to feel useless. Let's take a look at some helpful strategies to manage depression during retirement. 

Coping with depression during retirement

  1. Get Ready

Anticipating it is one way to avoid falling into depression. Start thinking about the activities you can carry out when you have more free time. In fact, you can start to integrate them into your daily activities, so when the time comes, the change is not so abrupt.

  1. It is a new beginning.

You must see it from a positive perspective. It is a stage in which we can learn new things or finish those projects that we’ve left incomplete or tackle new ideas we had to put on hold due to lack of time.

  1. Exercise regularly

Exercising is one of the best things you can do for your mental health. According to the Mayo Clinic, exercise can help treat and prevent depression since it releases chemicals such as endorphins, which can improve mood, reduces immune system chemicals that can worsen depression, and keep you strong and healthy.

  1. Eat healthy

A junk food diet can cause effects similar to chronic stress, which ultimately causes depression. It also has negative effects on our body since it deprives it of obtaining its vital nutrients to maintain adequate physical and mental health. To avoid this problem, eat healthy foods that include lean protein, fruit, and vegetables. Cut down foods high in sugar and fat, and avoid processed foods as much as possible. Finally, include omega-3 in your diet. You can find it in foods such as salmon, walnuts, or supplements.

  1. Meet new people

It is convenient that you carry out group activities to meet new people. Find out if there are classes for seniors in your area. Enrolling in classes and getting the opportunity to meet new people will help you stay active and talk about this new stage with people who are also facing it.

  1. Protect your loved ones

When you retire, it is normal to have thoughts and concerns about what will happen to your loved ones after you’re gone. These worries can lead to feelings of uneasiness that can quickly turn to depression as you may feel uncertain of your family’s financial security. To give yourself peace of mind, purchase a life insurance plan. At Insurance Supermarket Inc., we make it easy to get insured and protect the people who matter most to you. With an easy online application and no agent visits, you can get the coverage you need faster than ever. To learn more, visit our website and complete our quote form to protect your family.

Learn more about depression

As we age, we face all kinds of changes, such as the death of loved ones, stressful life events, or medical problems. It is normal to feel restless, stressed, or sad about these events, but after a while, the adjustment process comes, and we feel better.

Depression is different. It is a medical condition that affects daily life and normal functioning. It is not a sign of weakness and can be triggered by situations such as loneliness and retirement. To learn more about depression, we have selected three interesting books for further reading on the illnesses, but do not forget that the best help you can get is from your doctor.

Depression-Free, Naturally

By Joan Mathews Larson PhD

Surely you have heard the phrase you are what you eat. Throughout this book, nutritionist Joan Mathews Larson, Ph.D., provides tips for coping with depression and improving health through foods, vitamins, and minerals.

This is depression.

By Dr. Diane McIntosh

It is an extremely informative book, easy to understand, and appropriate for a wide audience. It will help you to empathize with people living with this disease and how this medical condition impacts friends, family, and health professionals.

Depression in Later Life: An Essential Guide

By Dr. Deborah Serani

When you are over 65 years old, many changes come into your life. You miss your work, friends, family, all those activities you had previously. When those feelings hit, anyone can start to experience depression. This book makes it clear that depression is an illness, not something to be ashamed of. The author clearly explains how later-life depression differs from depression in adolescence or earlier in life.

 

 

Written by Diane Taes

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